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On the Theme of
Our Sense of Hearing

Cochlea Surrounded by Waves.  36" x 42", mixed media, 2005.

The Cochlea is found in the inner ear. Filled with fluid, it transmits the pressure of sound waves to sensitive hair cells of the organ of Corti, which ultimately are transmited to the brain.

 

All microscope Images of inner ear hair cells (cilia) courtesy of James O. Pickles, University of Queensland.

A Chorus for Dionysus. 18 x 24 inches, mixed media, 2003.

 

Remeniscent of a chorus, a pipe organ, or perhaps columns on an ancient Greek stage, inner ear hair cells provide a backdrop for the chorus of a drama performed for the god Dionysus. Music captivated the Greeks, making musicians wealthy citizens, providing a core element to religious ceremonies, and thought to influence much more. Inseparable from numbers, music held for them the key to the spiritual and physical universe*.

*A History of Western Music" by Donald J. Grout and Claude V. Palisca. Norton and Company, Inc., ISBN 0-393-97527-4

Greek Passion for Music.  18 x 24 inches, mixed media, 2003.

 

This woman is playing an aulos, an instrument only played by slaves, courtesans and entertainers in ancient Greek times*. She reclines among hair cells of the inner ear, which bend to the sounds of the music and transfers them to the brain.

*A History of Western Music" by Donald J. Grout and Claude V. Palisca. Norton and Company, Inc., ISBN 0-393-97527-4.

African Nafara Dancers. 18" x 24", mixed media, 2003.

Nafara Dancers reference from the book "African Ceremonies" by Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 2002.

African Rhythm Women. 18" x 24", mixed media, 2003.  

African culture has music and rhythm at its heart.

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